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r/Ethereum - I wrote this to explain Ethereum in depth to newbies. Please check for accuracy!

Hello ethereum - I'm currently in Singapore exploring all of the cool blockchain tech that's going on here. I'm also writing a blog that aims to explain blockchain technology simply to anyone whose interested. www.cryptoambit.com
If you guys could spot check my Ethereum post for accuracy, I'd appreciate it. If you like it, would also appreciate some subscribers! Thanks
By now, most people know Ethereum as the second most valuable cryptocurrency, currently valued at over $60 billion dollars. Well, it turns out that Ethereum isn't actually a cryptocurrency - it's a software platform that let's programmers build applications on top of blockchain technology. Within the ethereum platform, is a cryptocurrency called ether that is used to power applications built on the Ethereum blockchain.
From Bitcoin to Ethereum
Bitcoin uses a global network of computers that maintain a shared ledger called a blockchain that keeps track of who owns bitcoin. Once blockchain technology was introduced to the world, people realized that blockchains could be used to keep track of anything of value. In 2013, a 19 year old named Vitalik Buterin introduced the Ethereum white paper, which proposed an open source platform that would let programmers build blockchain applications that could facilitate the exchange of money, content, property, shares or anything of value. Much like with Satoshi Nakamoto's paper, Buterin's was met with widespread excitement from software developers around the world who began building toward the vision Buterin laid out.
Much like Bitcoin, Ethereum isn't owned or controlled by any one person. Unlike Bitcoin, whose creator remains anonymous, Ethereum has a leader in Vitalik Buterin (pictured below). While Buterin doesn't control Ethereum in the way that a CEO does, his word carries tremendous weight in dictating the direction of the project - something that is considered a strength or a weakness, depending on who you ask.
Smart Contracts
The basic function that programs built on Ethereum perform are called smart contracts. Smart contracts are digital agreements that execute automatically based on real world data. An easy way to think of them is an "If-then statement." IF condition A exists, THEN perform function B.
Let's say for example Grandma wants to make sure she never forgets to give Little Billy birthday money each year. She could write a smart contract that says IF it's Little Billy's birthday, THEN pay him $10 from Grandma's account. Once this contract is broadcast to the Ethereum network, it will execute automatically each year on Little Billy's birthday.
Smart contracts have applications far beyond improving the reliability and efficiency of Grandmothers around the world. Another simple application of a smart contract is for rental payments: IF date = 1st of the month, THEN pay landlord rent amount. Processes that currently involve manual interactions between two parties can now be automated and the value can be moved in real time over the blockchain rather than settling days later as with traditional banking.
A Real World Example
Ethereum and smart contracts are a big deal because they have the ability to usher in what's been dubbed the "smart economy" - one in which slow manual processes prone to human error and deceit are replaced with automated processes that are completely transparent and trustworthy. A real world example that typifies the new "smart economy" is a project being run by a French insurance company called AXA.
AXA offers a flight insurance product that pays out a policy holder in the event that a flight is delayed by two hours or more. It currently has a product in trial that will pay out insurance claims using smart contracts and the Ethereum blockchain. The smart contract is simple: IF flight is over two hours late, THEN pay policyholder. The smart contract is connected to a database that monitors flight times. If the database shows that the flight is over two hours late, the smart contract is triggered and the policyholder is paid automatically over the blockchain.
Without the smart contract, the policyholder would have to file a claim and wait for the insurance company's claims department to process it, which could take anywhere from 1 to 2 weeks. With the smart contract, neither the insurance company nor the policyholder has to do anything. This also creates trust between the two parties because there are no grey areas - the customer can review the smart contract prior to purchasing the policy and feel comfortable that he will receive his claim in the event of a delay.
Ethereum vs Ether
As stated in the intro, Ethereum is a platform for building blockchain applications using smart contracts. What you may have just purchased on Coinbase is called Ether, which is the cryptocurrency that fuels the Ethereum network.
Ether functions more like a digital commodity than a digital currency. Just like you need gasoline to fuel your car, you need Ether to run applications on the Ethereum blockchain. In the Grandmother example cited above, Grandma would have to purchase small amounts of Ether to fuel her smart contract that pays Little Billy his birthday money.
The Ethereum blockchain functions in the same way as the Bitcoin blockchain: a network of computers run software that validates transactions through majority consensus. The people running these computers are called miners. Bitcoin miners are compensated for their resources by being paid in Bitcoin. Ethereum miners are compensated in Ether. On Little Billy's birthday, Grandma's ether transaction fee will go to whichever miner adds the block containing Grandma's transaction to the blockchain. That miner will also receive new Ether in the process.
The same supply/demand economics that apply to commodities like oil and gas also apply to Ether. Oil is valuable because it powers many of the things we use in our everyday life - it heats our homes and fuels our engines. The more people and enterprises that rely on Ethereum based applications, the higher the demand will be for Ether which will increase its value. As with all cryptocurrencies, there's plenty of speculation baked into the price - speculation that the demand for Ether will increase in the future. Since Ether is valuable, exchangeable and transferable, certain merchants are also starting to accept it as a currency.
dApps - Decentralized Apps
Applications that run smart contracts on the Ethereum blockchain are called "dApps," or decentralized apps. Just as any app developer can build apps on top of Apple's IOS operating system, developers can build on top of Ethereum's blockchain infrastructure. To the end user of a dApp, it might not look and feel any different than the apps you use today. It's the underlying blockchain infrastructure that make them different.
Since dApps function on top of the blockchain, they can be used to transfer value peer-to-peer. To return to our Grandmother example, there could be a dApp that Granny can download that lets her schedule Little Billy's birthday payments without having to code the smart contract herself. dApps are also completely open sourced so other people can access the code and build on top of them. Someone could take the code to the birthday payment dApp and add the ability for Grandma to add a note that says, "Happy Birthday Billy!" Running dApps on the blockchain also offers added security benefits. Since the transactions are distributed and encrypted across the Ethereum blockchain, there is no central place for a hacker to breach and gain access to all of the world's Grandmother to grandson birthday payment data.
At this point, I'm really beating the GrandmotheLittle Billy example to death because I think it represents a simple illustration for the kinds of applications that can be built on the Ethereum blockchain. In reality, the dApps that are being built are much more complex. Here are a few examples:
Ethereum Tokens
So now that you understand that Ethereum is a network for building decentralized applications that require a cryptocurrency called Ether to run, I'm going to introduce a confusing concept. Many dApps built on Ethereum have their own cryptocurrencies or "tokens." In order to interact with the dApps, customers need to purchase the dApp's native token.
Here's a helpful analogy I came across - when you go to a waterpark, you pay the admission fee and in return, you get a wristband. That wristband gives you the ability to ride the waterslides in the water park. With certain dApps, the token is the wristband, and a user must purchase it to interact with whatever the dApp offers.
Let's take a dApp called Golem as an example. Golem lets people rent out their excess computing power to people who need it - kind of like a computer AirBnb. To cite this article from Laura Shin, if I'm a computer graphics artist that wants to render some kind of computationally intense animation, I can purchase Golem tokens that let me tap into the Golem network to generate my animation. I then pay the people who are renting me their computers with the Golem tokens. The Golem token is a form of smart contract and this transaction is recorded on the Ethereum blockchain.
Since Golem tokens are also a cryptocurrency, they can be traded on the free market. If I'm a speculator who has no intention of using the Golem network to rent computing power, I can still buy the Golem token on an exchange in hopes that it appreciates in value. Like bitcoin, there is a fixed supply of Golem tokens so if the demand for the service increases, so will the value of the token. If I bought Golem at its original price of around 1 penny and held it to today, I would have made 35X my initial investment since Golem tokens currently trade around 35 cents a piece.
ICOs
ICO stands for, "Initial Coin Offering" which is a fundraising mechanism for cryptocurrencies which has exploded in popularity this year - the majority of them are held on the Ethereum network. Similar to a kickstarter campaign, they allow entrepreneurs to raise money for projects by giving investors an early opportunity to purchase the cryptocurrency before the final product has been built. If the project is successful, the value of the cryptocurrency will rise in value and early investors can sell it on the open market for a profit.
ICOs have stirred up a lot of controversy because they represent a risky proposition with zero investor protection. Let's say I wanted to build a casino and to finance it, I gave investors the opportunity to buy chips that can be used at my roulette tables once the casino opened. If you bought $100K in roulette chips from me and I decide that I no longer want to build the casino, you're stuck holding worthless chips. If investors don't do their due diligence, they may end up buying tokens for a project whose creators never intended on building it in he first place - the creators walk away with the money and the investors have no way of recouping their funds.
On the other hand, early investors in projects that go on to be successful have the opportunity to make enormous returns. For example, people who invested $1,000 in the Golem ICO would be sitting on $35,000 at it's current price of $0.35 - if it ever goes to $10, they're all millionaires. Another positive aspect of ICOs is that they let anyone, rich or poor get involved in early stage investing. To invest in a company like Twitter or Facebook pre-IPO (initial public offering), you need to be an accredited investor - this basically means you're already a rich person. With ICOs, all you need is an internet connection and a little bit of money and you have the potential to become wealthy by investing in the right projects.
Far From Perfect
Ethereum has the potential to change the way humans transact with one another but it is still a very young technology and it hasn't been without its problems. While the blockchain architecture underlying the Ethereum network is secure, not all of the applications built on top of it are. Faulty code can and has made applications vulnerable to hacking and malfunctions. Here are two prime examples:
DAO Hack - DAO was a dApp built on Ethereum that enabled crowd based venture capital. DAO token holders were given the right to vote on projects they wanted to support - if projects went on to be successful, DAO token holders would receive financial rewards. The DAO ICO received $168 million in funding. The DAO software was hosted on the Ethereum blockchain and was publically visible by all. A hacker spotted a flaw in the DAO's code that enabled him to route $55M in ether held by the DAO into an account that he controlled. The Ethereum team had do do something called a hard fork (something I won't get into now) to reverse return the stolen funds. Parity Wallet Freeze - Parity is a wallet where people store Ether. A flaw in Parity's code let a user delete a specific line of code that was necessary for accessing funds in a Parity wallet. This led to $280 million dollars worth of ether being frozen - it hasn't been stolen but it can't be accessed either. Parity Technologies has proposed another hard fork to correct the issue - something that is sure to divide the Ethereum community and rattle user confidence.
Despite the world changing implications that Ethereum dApps and smart contracts have, the trouble is that any programmer can write them - if they aren't written properly, they can behave in unintended ways and be exploited like in the above listed examples. Ethereum is still a very young network and security issues with dApps and smart contracts will have to be sorted out if its to reach its true aspirations.
Leading The Decentralized Revolution
“Ethereum aims to take the promise of decentralization, openness and security that is at the core of blockchain technology and brings it to almost anything that can be computed.” - Vitalik Buterin
With dApps, smart contracts and blockchain technology, Ethereum is leading the decentralized revolution. Bitcoin is the world's first decentralized currency, that operates on a global network of computers outside of central intermediaries. Ethereum gives programmers a platform to develop a decentralized version of just about anything.
Decentralized networks like Ethereum have the power to remove the intermediaries that currently exist between producer and consumer. Let's take a company like Uber. Uber is a platform that brings people who need rides together with people who have cars. To facilitate this interaction, Uber collects 20% of every ride. With Ethereum and blockchain technology, there is nothing to prevent a bunch of software developers from writing a dApp that creates a decentralized Uber. Instead of 20% per ride, transaction fees are paid to the network and the driver takes home the lions share of the transaction. Tokens can be issued that represent ownership in the network. Coders who work on improving the network can get paid for their efforts in ownership tokens. Non-technical people can come up with marketing campaigns that spread awareness for the network and also get compensated in ownership tokens. As the decentralized Uber network grows and improves, the value of its ownership token increases, rewarding the people that built it. The result is whats referred to as a "Decentralized Autonomous Organization" and theres a strong possibility that DAOs replace a lot of the world's biggest corporations.
This may sound like a radical concept but blockchain technology enables these kinds of decentralized organizations to exist - Ethereum provides the tools for people to go out and build them.
submitted by CryptigoVespucci to ethereum [link] [comments]

I Created a Custom Lightning Payment Jackpot Website from Scratch, This Is What I Learnt

TL;DR: I wanted to learn how the Lightning Network operates. So I came up with an idea for a jackpot site using the Lightning Network to handle micro-payments. Operating a Lightning node is complicated and challenging for a beginner. Using custodial wallets like Wallet of Satoshi, BlueWallet or Breez is easy to use but not your keys. Please come by and help me test my Lightning integrated new website. I’m happy to help anyone that’s new to Lightning setup a wallet and play a game. It all helps with learning and adoption, that’s why we’re all here! Long Bitcoin, Short the Bankers!

Introduction: Welcome to a brand new concept in random number seeding. Generating a truly random number is quite hard. You could use the current time, divided by the RPM spin of your hard disk, squared by the temperature of your CPU, and so on. Other extreme methods include measuring quantum fluctuations in a vacuum, see ANU Quantum Random Number. All these methods are fine but none of these are really verifiable by a 3rd party. Whoever running the system can change the outcome. I'm not saying they do, simply stating that if the payoff was great enough to alter the 'reported' outcome they could. So what's different here? We're using the Bitcoin blockchain itself as the arbitrator. Every outcome is not only provably fair but verifiably fair and immutable. Trying to cheat this system is impossible.

So that’s the pitch. Make a website using the idea of whoever’s guess is closest, wins the jackpot; using Lightning to handle all the incoming and outgoing payments. I started to look around at other fully functional websites offering Lightning as a payment method. It turns out most use a 3rd party like OpenNode or CoinGate. To me, this defeats the whole purpose of Bitcoin. Why build a website/offer a service/offer Lightning as a payment method if you don’t even own or control your funds. A payment processor could simply turn off withdrawals and it’s over. Not your keys, not your coins!

It’s been quite a learning experience for me. I think the most frustrating thing to figure out and attempt to solve was channel capacity. For example, with a fresh new wallet setup on Bitcoin Lightning for Andriod (blue bolt logo), you can open a channel to anyone fine, but trying to receive money won’t work. I think for a beginneadoption this is the greatest hurdle to understand/overcome.
You need to spend money so the other side has some collateral to send back. One explanation I read was, opening Lightning channels are like a full glass of water, I need to tip some of my water into your empty glass so my glass has some room to fill it back up, it can’t overflow. Another one is like beads on a string. The number of beads is up to you but if all the beads are on your side, the other party can’t push any beats your way because you have them all. There’s ways to fix this. Either spend into the channel or buy incoming channel capacity. On the spend side, you can use websites like lightningconductor.net which allow you to send money to their Lightning node, from your new channel, and they’ll send the coins to your on-chain Bitcoin wallet. This is a simple way to empty your glass or push those beads to the other side and still retain all your money, minus LN and on-chain fees. For incoming capacity, you can use LNBig and get 400k satoshis of incoming capacity for free or lightningto.me, or you can pay lightningpowerusers.com or bitrefill.com to open larger capacity channels to you for a small fee.

For a beginner or someone new to Bitcoin/Lightning, using a custodial wallet like BlueWallet, Wallet of Satosh or Breez is far easier than trying to setup channels and buy or massage incoming capacity. You can simply install the application and using lightningconductor.net BTC to LN you can send some Bitcoin and they’ll forward it on to your lightning wallet, for a fee. These custodial wallets accept incoming transactions of 1 million satoshis or more. So now you’ve got a working wallet that’s got a few thousand satoshis, keep reading!

How to play: Two things are verifiable on the blockchain, time between blocks and transactions included in that block. First choose which block#, by default it will be the next one coming up. Then choose a public alias, others will be able to see your bets but they won’t know if you’ve paid or not, only you can see that. Next, guess the time it will take to mine the next Bitcoin or the number of transactions in that block. You can make multiple guesses. If you want to place a number of spread bets, I suggest opening a spreadsheet and getting it to generate the times or transactions for you. For example, put in 2300, then 2350, 2375, 2400, then drag down to generate as many in the sequence as you want. You can bet a maximum of 25 per invoice. This will hopefully ensure the small transaction amount will be successful. Once you’ve generated an invoice, pay it from the QR code or the lightning bolt11 string.
Now you’re ready to go. Wait till the next block goes active or the block you’ve bet on and you’ll see your bets and everyone else’s. Most importantly, what the final jackpot is. Unpaid invoices are discarded. If the block rolls over while you’re making up your mind the page will refresh and you could lose your input. Please plan your bets in notepad or a spreadsheet. I know this is annoying but I never claimed to be a UX codedesigner! It was a struggle getting all the css, ajax and javascript working, ahhhrrrrggg!! Next is the interesting part as this game can become competitive.

Game theory: As others make bets, you can encapsulate theirs. For example, they guess 2750 transactions, you can bet 2749 and 2751. While at first this seems unfair, what it doesn't show is what bets have been paid for and what have not. Only you can see your own bets that are paid and unpaid. To everyone else they look like paid bets. Only when the next block/jackpot starts can you see what's been paid for as unpaid bets are discarded. By placing dummy bets, unpaid, you can sucker someone in and greatly increase the jackpot payout at no cost to yourself. You can also use the same alias, for example, open up two different browsers, one for real bets and one for fake bets. This is why there’s a 25 bet limit, I don’t want people going too crazy with this. You can check your bets in the footer bar under ‘previous bets’. Also, IMPORTANT, please keep track of your account number at the top. If your session or browser has a problem, you can lose access to your bets and jackpot winnings. If this happens and you receive a new account number, simple use the claim jackpot in the footer to claim your winning jackpot. If you don’t have this, I can’t help you if something goes wrong. Rather than having a login/password system you have a unique account id. Don’t lose it! Now back to the blockchain.

What a minute… I though it took 10 minutes to confirm a block? Not always, actually it does this very rarely. If you average out every block over time, it averages around ten minutes. A block is confirmed when a miner takes transactions from the memory pool, up to ~1.2mb worth. Next, now this is the hard part, they need to generate a hash for that block, but it needs to start with X number of leading zeros. To achieve this, they use a random number called a nonce to seed/salt the hash and hopefully, it contains X number of zeros at the start of the block hash. If not, discard and keep trying. The winning block contains the miners local time, which can sometimes be wrong. This is why sometimes you get negative block times. See block #180966 then the next block, #180967's time stamp is before the first one! Who cares, as long as the later block references the previous block to keep the chain intact. You can’t guess negative numbers but you can guess 0 seconds. Which I guess is like betting on the green zero in roulette.

Ready to play?
Each bet is worth 5,000 satoshis. I wanted it to be expensive enough to prevent spam and also the jackpots be large enough that it would be worth playing. I hope you have fun.
Website is https://blockwisdom.com
My Twitter handle is @nixdice
If you have any questions or issues, please contact me here or on Twitter I’ll try my best to sort it out quickly.
submitted by nixdice to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Monero Subreddit Stats from last year.

Submissions Comments
Total 994 49530
Rate (per day) 2.73 135.74
Unique Redditors 582 8080
Combined Score 161184 231580

Top Submitters' Top Submissions

  1. 5300 points, 33 submissions: dEBRUYNE_1
    1. Monero GUI 0.12.0.0 "Lithium Luna" Megathread - Download links, instructions for upgrading, guide on how to get started, and guides to resolve common issues (missing a transaction / zero balance, freezing / buggy GUI, transaction stuck as pending, and GUI using all bandwidth) (386 points, 833 comments)
    2. [Reminder] monero is not the appropriate place to discuss the BTC/BCH debate (319 points, 73 comments)
    3. General information regarding the upcoming scheduled network upgrade and a call for community action (305 points, 223 comments)
    4. GUI v0.12.2.0 released! (299 points, 243 comments)
    5. Announcement - Proof-of-Work tweak and a note on key reuse (295 points, 250 comments)
    6. GUI v0.12.3.0 (with direct Ledger support) released! (280 points, 386 comments)
    7. Bitfinex reduces Monero withdrawal fees from 0.04 to 0.0001 XMR! (272 points, 9 comments)
    8. Poloniex also reduces Monero withdrawal fees to 0.0001 XMR! (220 points, 17 comments)
    9. Preliminary information thread regarding the scheduled protocol upgrade of October 18 (214 points, 208 comments)
    10. CLI v0.12.3.0 released! (195 points, 78 comments)
  2. 4228 points, 24 submissions: OsrsNeedsF2P
    1. Saying you don't need privacy because you have nothing to hide is like saying you don't need free speech because you have nothing to say. It's a right to everyone - It's a right to you, me, and even Mark Zuckerberg. (581 points, 138 comments)
    2. The official Fortnite Merch Store is accepting exclusively Monero as a cryptocurrency payment option... (445 points, 80 comments)
    3. Can we stop being assholes to newbies? (359 points, 94 comments)
    4. With all this Monero "is less untraceable than previously thought" FUD, let's all remember that huge fucking bounty of $$$ for anyone who can trace the origin of one of the devs transactions.. (343 points, 131 comments)
    5. Ever wanted to know how Monero is still around today? Well now you don't have to! This post has it all =D (297 points, 66 comments)
    6. Coinmarketcap shows Freewallet as a Monero wallet. Guys, whatever you do.. Don't use Freewallet. It's a scam. (286 points, 93 comments)
    7. SEC wants decentralized exchange creators to register as exchanges. Lol (182 points, 111 comments)
    8. "Please do your part in demanding exchanges to lower their XMR withdraw fee. I am submitting a complaint to Coinex who currently charge 0.04 XMR" - [x-post from /xmrtrader] (169 points, 43 comments)
    9. Can we get some appreciation for the people who maintain the Monero packages on Arch Linux? There are so many available, and every single one I've checked either make the package from source or validate the checksum. Amazing work <3 (156 points, 19 comments)
    10. [WARNING] DROPIL recently made a post announcing support for Monero. MOVE YOUR FUNDS if you used them!!! (119 points, 5 comments)
  3. 3954 points, 13 submissions: KnifeOfPi2
    1. Did John McAfee just sell all of his Monero?? (1277 points, 107 comments)
    2. We need to stop thinking about Monero as a “privacy coin.” (511 points, 200 comments)
    3. Selsta and I just completed the first Ledger-to-Ledger mainnet transactions ever. He sent me 0.1 XMR and I sent 0.4 XMR back. (482 points, 103 comments)
    4. Monero network hashrate just hit 1GH/s! (463 points, 166 comments)
    5. An upcoming Monero project: Render the entire blockchain. Here's a selection of blocks that we've done so far, in an early stage. (224 points, 31 comments)
    6. In Stunning Move, Bitmain Announces It's Launching A Doorstopper Business (193 points, 48 comments)
    7. Another red flag for X Wallet: The source code is incomplete. (190 points, 63 comments)
    8. MONERO IS DEAD! LONG LIVE MONERO! (155 points, 25 comments)
    9. Lithium Luna GUI released! (118 points, 66 comments)
    10. Cake Wallet - introducing Zendesk support! (100 points, 13 comments)
  4. 2421 points, 22 submissions: SamsungGalaxyPlayer
    1. Kasisto POS in 22 seconds (366 points, 76 comments)
    2. "Kudelski Security completed their [bulletproof] report. They found only a few minor issues that are trivial to correct, and no major issues." Overall, a huge win for Monero, bulletproofs, and privacy. Full report will be published soon. (338 points, 100 comments)
    3. Network upgrade scheduled for block 1544555 on 28 March (210 points, 56 comments)
    4. Fungibility is determined by the LOWEST common denominator of privacy, NOT the highest. Monero absolutely excels here. (103 points, 37 comments)
    5. [Discussion] Move to a Fixed Ringsize (102 points, 85 comments)
    6. The Monero Malware Response workgroup website is up! Direct people whose machines have been compromised here! (101 points, 22 comments)
    7. MoneroV: A Trap Laid for Monero Users? (93 points, 45 comments)
    8. Want to get the GUI point release faster? Help translate! (91 points, 18 comments)
    9. Introducing the Breaking Monero Series! (86 points, 26 comments)
    10. ShapeShift is moving to a membership model and will require personal information soon (83 points, 86 comments)
  5. 2295 points, 16 submissions: pinkphloid
    1. Cake Wallet - OPEN SOURCE - Here it is! (383 points, 167 comments)
    2. Our Monero wallet called CAKEWALLET for iOS is live! Please check the link to the Apple App Store below. (347 points, 379 comments)
    3. [MANDATORY UPDATE] Cake Wallet Version 3.0.9 - Network Upgrade Ready! (227 points, 19 comments)
    4. [UPDATE] Cake Wallet version 3.1.4, now with XMR.TO for exchanging XMR to BTC! (133 points, 15 comments)
    5. Cake Wallet - 10,000 unique downloads! (132 points, 29 comments)
    6. Thank for the positive feedback on Cake Wallet! (127 points, 62 comments)
    7. The new Cake Wallet Update version 3.0.1 is out now! (120 points, 50 comments)
    8. [UPDATE] CAKE WALLET 3.1.1 with Monero v0.13.0.4 and other stuff (118 points, 32 comments)
    9. Cake Wallet - UPDATE! (108 points, 75 comments)
    10. CAKE WALLET - new version live now with NEW FEATURES! (102 points, 97 comments)
  6. 2042 points, 16 submissions: Rehrar
    1. Core Team Announcement (344 points, 45 comments)
    2. Project FOSS (212 points, 37 comments)
    3. Write down your seed (200 points, 93 comments)
    4. Bulletproof audit needs some more funding. Details in the comments. (170 points, 55 comments)
    5. Extremely thorough introduction to Monero by cypherperro. Take a look. (122 points, 18 comments)
    6. Defcon Monero Village Update and Summary (116 points, 22 comments)
    7. MRL Bulletproof audit FFS request (115 points, 30 comments)
    8. I, rehrar,went on a YouTube show to talk about Morono (113 points, 28 comments)
    9. Fund the fundings! (107 points, 16 comments)
    10. The anonimal appreciation thread! (107 points, 21 comments)
  7. 1978 points, 15 submissions: Vespco
    1. Edward Snowden on Bitcoin Interview 2018 (at 50 minutes, he says that a traceable public ledger is a bigger problem then scalability) (362 points, 88 comments)
    2. Putting this on my invoices seems like a good way for me to promote Monero, give my customers a discount, & help me acquire more Monero. (325 points, 101 comments)
    3. It's fun to be a part of the Monero economy! (179 points, 26 comments)
    4. Honest Government Ad | Anti Encryption Law (178 points, 32 comments)
    5. Jeez, not much real conversation in here. Just junky news links. (129 points, 76 comments)
    6. The New York State Department of Financial Services just approved the trading of privacy-protecting cryptocurrency. | Coin Center (124 points, 11 comments)
    7. A good way to explain the importance of fungibility to the laymen: Bitcoin Roulette (99 points, 45 comments)
    8. Why I love Botnet & Browser Mining. (86 points, 39 comments)
    9. This needs more praise & attention: An Open Source, Client Side JS implementation that makes monero multisig fairly easy. Github link in comments. (82 points, 14 comments)
    10. Could we get even more cryptographers researching for Monero? (77 points, 31 comments)
  8. 1846 points, 14 submissions: SarangNoether
    1. Bulletproofs: let's raise some funds! (295 points, 94 comments)
    2. January monthly report from Sarang Noether (237 points, 39 comments)
    3. Bulletproofs: The Paper Strikes Back (153 points, 32 comments)
    4. July monthly report from Sarang Noether (142 points, 20 comments)
    5. March monthly report from Sarang Noether (129 points, 22 comments)
    6. August monthly report from Sarang Noether (122 points, 33 comments)
    7. February monthly report from Sarang Noether (119 points, 27 comments)
    8. Sarang is up for three more months! (107 points, 30 comments)
    9. October monthly report from Sarang Noether (102 points, 26 comments)
    10. September monthly report from Sarang Noether (99 points, 25 comments)
  9. 1470 points, 4 submissions: TheFuzzStone
    1. "I do not have any Bitcoin" (1182 points, 96 comments)
    2. Fluffypony at Consensus 2018 (134 points, 33 comments)
    3. Time for Monero "killers"! :-) (91 points, 34 comments)
    4. XMR.RU-report (March) (63 points, 14 comments)
  10. 1468 points, 5 submissions: philkode
    1. Overstock.com accepting Monero (and ETH, BCH, LTC, DASH) (499 points, 36 comments)
    2. Happy 4th Birthday Monero! 🎂🎉🎁 (455 points, 62 comments)
    3. Monero has been added to Debian unstable repo as of yesterday. (321 points, 52 comments)
    4. “Unhackable” BitFi wallet just got hacked (xpost /cryptocurrency) (130 points, 41 comments)
    5. X Wallet to App Store (Soon™) (63 points, 67 comments)

Top Commenters

  1. dEBRUYNE_1 (3762 points, 1243 comments)
  2. KnifeOfPi2 (3311 points, 347 comments)
  3. OsrsNeedsF2P (3189 points, 505 comments)
  4. fluffyponyza (3027 points, 272 comments)
  5. gingeropolous (2554 points, 320 comments)
  6. cryptochangements34 (2522 points, 261 comments)
  7. SarangNoether (2269 points, 185 comments)
  8. SamsungGalaxyPlayer (2108 points, 221 comments)
  9. john_alan (1993 points, 218 comments)
  10. smooth_xmr (1944 points, 279 comments)

Top Submissions

  1. Did John McAfee just sell all of his Monero?? by KnifeOfPi2 (1277 points, 107 comments)
  2. Paypal shares your personal data with over 600 companies! That's why we need Monero! by 0xf3e (1184 points, 146 comments)
  3. "I do not have any Bitcoin" by TheFuzzStone (1182 points, 96 comments)
  4. Found In Warsaw - Don't Buy Monero: Cryptocurrencies harm the banking system and can weaken the government by SecretApe (1114 points, 110 comments)
  5. Monero transactions are about to get 80% cheaper and faster. by WillMTB (1056 points, 120 comments)
  6. Bye bye ASICs by Swericor (874 points, 380 comments)
  7. Upvote if you would like to see @fluffyponyza as a guest on Joe Rogan Podcast by xmr_karnal (840 points, 44 comments)
  8. All right, my cat had kittens and I just realised one of them has Monero-like logo on its head 😂😂 by JNKO266 (817 points, 79 comments)
  9. Credit, where credit is due! by Experts-say (796 points, 53 comments)
  10. Yesterday I thought it might be fun to create some vintage crypto posters for a handful of coins. This was the first one I came up with. Bonus points if you spot similarities from an old movie by Beemoe4 (722 points, 67 comments)

Top Comments

  1. 495 points: mr670wl's comment in Found In Warsaw - Don't Buy Monero: Cryptocurrencies harm the banking system and can weaken the government
  2. 474 points: kieranc001's comment in Monero Zero looks like a scam, can you please confirm?
  3. 380 points: deleted's comment in Found In Warsaw - Don't Buy Monero: Cryptocurrencies harm the banking system and can weaken the government
  4. 356 points: deleted's comment in Ledger Hardware Wallet - Monero integration : some news #6
  5. 331 points: last_of_the_romans's comment in Monero transactions are about to get 80% cheaper and faster.
  6. 323 points: svenroy777's comment in "I do not have any Bitcoin"
  7. 311 points: deleted's comment in Did John McAfee just sell all of his Monero??
  8. 255 points: KnifeOfPi2's comment in Monero transactions are about to get 80% cheaper and faster.
  9. 237 points: live9free1or1die's comment in Banning privacy coins because of terrorism/drugs/laundering is like banning people from being allowed to have sex in privacy because pedophiles also like privacy.
  10. 203 points: fluffyponyza's comment in Botnets are Ruining the Integrity of the Monero Network
Generated with BBoe's Subreddit Stats (Donate)
Inspired by a post I found on /Pivx by turtleflax.
submitted by OsrsNeedsF2P to Monero [link] [comments]

Subreddit Stats: Monero top posts from 2018-01-03 to 2019-01-02 13:47 PDT

Period: 364.01 days
Submissions Comments
Total 994 49530
Rate (per day) 2.73 135.74
Unique Redditors 582 8080
Combined Score 161184 231580

Top Submitters' Top Submissions

  1. 5300 points, 33 submissions: dEBRUYNE_1
    1. Monero GUI 0.12.0.0 "Lithium Luna" Megathread - Download links, instructions for upgrading, guide on how to get started, and guides to resolve common issues (missing a transaction / zero balance, freezing / buggy GUI, transaction stuck as pending, and GUI using all bandwidth) (386 points, 833 comments)
    2. [Reminder] monero is not the appropriate place to discuss the BTC/BCH debate (319 points, 73 comments)
    3. General information regarding the upcoming scheduled network upgrade and a call for community action (305 points, 223 comments)
    4. GUI v0.12.2.0 released! (299 points, 243 comments)
    5. Announcement - Proof-of-Work tweak and a note on key reuse (295 points, 250 comments)
    6. GUI v0.12.3.0 (with direct Ledger support) released! (280 points, 386 comments)
    7. Bitfinex reduces Monero withdrawal fees from 0.04 to 0.0001 XMR! (272 points, 9 comments)
    8. Poloniex also reduces Monero withdrawal fees to 0.0001 XMR! (220 points, 17 comments)
    9. Preliminary information thread regarding the scheduled protocol upgrade of October 18 (214 points, 208 comments)
    10. CLI v0.12.3.0 released! (195 points, 78 comments)
  2. 4228 points, 24 submissions: OsrsNeedsF2P
    1. Saying you don't need privacy because you have nothing to hide is like saying you don't need free speech because you have nothing to say. It's a right to everyone - It's a right to you, me, and even Mark Zuckerberg. (581 points, 138 comments)
    2. The official Fortnite Merch Store is accepting exclusively Monero as a cryptocurrency payment option... (445 points, 80 comments)
    3. Can we stop being assholes to newbies? (359 points, 94 comments)
    4. With all this Monero "is less untraceable than previously thought" FUD, let's all remember that huge fucking bounty of $$$ for anyone who can trace the origin of one of the devs transactions.. (343 points, 131 comments)
    5. Ever wanted to know how Monero is still around today? Well now you don't have to! This post has it all =D (297 points, 66 comments)
    6. Coinmarketcap shows Freewallet as a Monero wallet. Guys, whatever you do.. Don't use Freewallet. It's a scam. (286 points, 93 comments)
    7. SEC wants decentralized exchange creators to register as exchanges. Lol (182 points, 111 comments)
    8. "Please do your part in demanding exchanges to lower their XMR withdraw fee. I am submitting a complaint to Coinex who currently charge 0.04 XMR" - [x-post from /xmrtrader] (169 points, 43 comments)
    9. Can we get some appreciation for the people who maintain the Monero packages on Arch Linux? There are so many available, and every single one I've checked either make the package from source or validate the checksum. Amazing work <3 (156 points, 19 comments)
    10. [WARNING] DROPIL recently made a post announcing support for Monero. MOVE YOUR FUNDS if you used them!!! (119 points, 5 comments)
  3. 3954 points, 13 submissions: KnifeOfPi2
    1. Did John McAfee just sell all of his Monero?? (1277 points, 107 comments)
    2. We need to stop thinking about Monero as a “privacy coin.” (511 points, 200 comments)
    3. Selsta and I just completed the first Ledger-to-Ledger mainnet transactions ever. He sent me 0.1 XMR and I sent 0.4 XMR back. (482 points, 103 comments)
    4. Monero network hashrate just hit 1GH/s! (463 points, 166 comments)
    5. An upcoming Monero project: Render the entire blockchain. Here's a selection of blocks that we've done so far, in an early stage. (224 points, 31 comments)
    6. In Stunning Move, Bitmain Announces It's Launching A Doorstopper Business (193 points, 48 comments)
    7. Another red flag for X Wallet: The source code is incomplete. (190 points, 63 comments)
    8. MONERO IS DEAD! LONG LIVE MONERO! (155 points, 25 comments)
    9. Lithium Luna GUI released! (118 points, 66 comments)
    10. Cake Wallet - introducing Zendesk support! (100 points, 13 comments)
  4. 2421 points, 22 submissions: SamsungGalaxyPlayer
    1. Kasisto POS in 22 seconds (366 points, 76 comments)
    2. "Kudelski Security completed their [bulletproof] report. They found only a few minor issues that are trivial to correct, and no major issues." Overall, a huge win for Monero, bulletproofs, and privacy. Full report will be published soon. (338 points, 100 comments)
    3. Network upgrade scheduled for block 1544555 on 28 March (210 points, 56 comments)
    4. Fungibility is determined by the LOWEST common denominator of privacy, NOT the highest. Monero absolutely excels here. (103 points, 37 comments)
    5. [Discussion] Move to a Fixed Ringsize (102 points, 85 comments)
    6. The Monero Malware Response workgroup website is up! Direct people whose machines have been compromised here! (101 points, 22 comments)
    7. MoneroV: A Trap Laid for Monero Users? (93 points, 45 comments)
    8. Want to get the GUI point release faster? Help translate! (91 points, 18 comments)
    9. Introducing the Breaking Monero Series! (86 points, 26 comments)
    10. ShapeShift is moving to a membership model and will require personal information soon (83 points, 86 comments)
  5. 2295 points, 16 submissions: pinkphloid
    1. Cake Wallet - OPEN SOURCE - Here it is! (383 points, 167 comments)
    2. Our Monero wallet called CAKEWALLET for iOS is live! Please check the link to the Apple App Store below. (347 points, 379 comments)
    3. [MANDATORY UPDATE] Cake Wallet Version 3.0.9 - Network Upgrade Ready! (227 points, 19 comments)
    4. [UPDATE] Cake Wallet version 3.1.4, now with XMR.TO for exchanging XMR to BTC! (133 points, 15 comments)
    5. Cake Wallet - 10,000 unique downloads! (132 points, 29 comments)
    6. Thank for the positive feedback on Cake Wallet! (127 points, 62 comments)
    7. The new Cake Wallet Update version 3.0.1 is out now! (120 points, 50 comments)
    8. [UPDATE] CAKE WALLET 3.1.1 with Monero v0.13.0.4 and other stuff (118 points, 32 comments)
    9. Cake Wallet - UPDATE! (108 points, 75 comments)
    10. CAKE WALLET - new version live now with NEW FEATURES! (102 points, 97 comments)
  6. 2042 points, 16 submissions: Rehrar
    1. Core Team Announcement (344 points, 45 comments)
    2. Project FOSS (212 points, 37 comments)
    3. Write down your seed (200 points, 93 comments)
    4. Bulletproof audit needs some more funding. Details in the comments. (170 points, 55 comments)
    5. Extremely thorough introduction to Monero by cypherperro. Take a look. (122 points, 18 comments)
    6. Defcon Monero Village Update and Summary (116 points, 22 comments)
    7. MRL Bulletproof audit FFS request (115 points, 30 comments)
    8. I, rehrar,went on a YouTube show to talk about Morono (113 points, 28 comments)
    9. Fund the fundings! (107 points, 16 comments)
    10. The anonimal appreciation thread! (107 points, 21 comments)
  7. 1978 points, 15 submissions: Vespco
    1. Edward Snowden on Bitcoin Interview 2018 (at 50 minutes, he says that a traceable public ledger is a bigger problem then scalability) (362 points, 88 comments)
    2. Putting this on my invoices seems like a good way for me to promote Monero, give my customers a discount, & help me acquire more Monero. (325 points, 101 comments)
    3. It's fun to be a part of the Monero economy! (179 points, 26 comments)
    4. Honest Government Ad | Anti Encryption Law (178 points, 32 comments)
    5. Jeez, not much real conversation in here. Just junky news links. (129 points, 76 comments)
    6. The New York State Department of Financial Services just approved the trading of privacy-protecting cryptocurrency. | Coin Center (124 points, 11 comments)
    7. A good way to explain the importance of fungibility to the laymen: Bitcoin Roulette (99 points, 45 comments)
    8. Why I love Botnet & Browser Mining. (86 points, 39 comments)
    9. This needs more praise & attention: An Open Source, Client Side JS implementation that makes monero multisig fairly easy. Github link in comments. (82 points, 14 comments)
    10. Could we get even more cryptographers researching for Monero? (77 points, 31 comments)
  8. 1846 points, 14 submissions: SarangNoether
    1. Bulletproofs: let's raise some funds! (295 points, 94 comments)
    2. January monthly report from Sarang Noether (237 points, 39 comments)
    3. Bulletproofs: The Paper Strikes Back (153 points, 32 comments)
    4. July monthly report from Sarang Noether (142 points, 20 comments)
    5. March monthly report from Sarang Noether (129 points, 22 comments)
    6. August monthly report from Sarang Noether (122 points, 33 comments)
    7. February monthly report from Sarang Noether (119 points, 27 comments)
    8. Sarang is up for three more months! (107 points, 30 comments)
    9. October monthly report from Sarang Noether (102 points, 26 comments)
    10. September monthly report from Sarang Noether (99 points, 25 comments)
  9. 1470 points, 4 submissions: TheFuzzStone
    1. "I do not have any Bitcoin" (1182 points, 96 comments)
    2. Fluffypony at Consensus 2018 (134 points, 33 comments)
    3. Time for Monero "killers"! :-) (91 points, 34 comments)
    4. XMR.RU-report (March) (63 points, 14 comments)
  10. 1468 points, 5 submissions: philkode
    1. Overstock.com accepting Monero (and ETH, BCH, LTC, DASH) (499 points, 36 comments)
    2. Happy 4th Birthday Monero! 🎂🎉🎁 (455 points, 62 comments)
    3. Monero has been added to Debian unstable repo as of yesterday. (321 points, 52 comments)
    4. “Unhackable” BitFi wallet just got hacked (xpost /cryptocurrency) (130 points, 41 comments)
    5. X Wallet to App Store (Soon™) (63 points, 67 comments)

Top Commenters

  1. dEBRUYNE_1 (3762 points, 1243 comments)
  2. KnifeOfPi2 (3311 points, 347 comments)
  3. OsrsNeedsF2P (3189 points, 505 comments)
  4. fluffyponyza (3027 points, 272 comments)
  5. gingeropolous (2554 points, 320 comments)
  6. cryptochangements34 (2522 points, 261 comments)
  7. SarangNoether (2269 points, 185 comments)
  8. SamsungGalaxyPlayer (2108 points, 221 comments)
  9. john_alan (1993 points, 218 comments)
  10. smooth_xmr (1944 points, 279 comments)

Top Submissions

  1. Did John McAfee just sell all of his Monero?? by KnifeOfPi2 (1277 points, 107 comments)
  2. Paypal shares your personal data with over 600 companies! That's why we need Monero! by 0xf3e (1184 points, 146 comments)
  3. "I do not have any Bitcoin" by TheFuzzStone (1182 points, 96 comments)
  4. Found In Warsaw - Don't Buy Monero: Cryptocurrencies harm the banking system and can weaken the government by SecretApe (1114 points, 110 comments)
  5. Monero transactions are about to get 80% cheaper and faster. by WillMTB (1056 points, 120 comments)
  6. Bye bye ASICs by Swericor (874 points, 380 comments)
  7. Upvote if you would like to see @fluffyponyza as a guest on Joe Rogan Podcast by xmr_karnal (840 points, 44 comments)
  8. All right, my cat had kittens and I just realised one of them has Monero-like logo on its head 😂😂 by JNKO266 (817 points, 79 comments)
  9. Credit, where credit is due! by Experts-say (796 points, 53 comments)
  10. Yesterday I thought it might be fun to create some vintage crypto posters for a handful of coins. This was the first one I came up with. Bonus points if you spot similarities from an old movie by Beemoe4 (722 points, 67 comments)

Top Comments

  1. 495 points: mr670wl's comment in Found In Warsaw - Don't Buy Monero: Cryptocurrencies harm the banking system and can weaken the government
  2. 474 points: kieranc001's comment in Monero Zero looks like a scam, can you please confirm?
  3. 380 points: deleted's comment in Found In Warsaw - Don't Buy Monero: Cryptocurrencies harm the banking system and can weaken the government
  4. 356 points: deleted's comment in Ledger Hardware Wallet - Monero integration : some news #6
  5. 331 points: last_of_the_romans's comment in Monero transactions are about to get 80% cheaper and faster.
  6. 323 points: svenroy777's comment in "I do not have any Bitcoin"
  7. 311 points: deleted's comment in Did John McAfee just sell all of his Monero??
  8. 255 points: KnifeOfPi2's comment in Monero transactions are about to get 80% cheaper and faster.
  9. 237 points: live9free1or1die's comment in Banning privacy coins because of terrorism/drugs/laundering is like banning people from being allowed to have sex in privacy because pedophiles also like privacy.
  10. 203 points: fluffyponyza's comment in Botnets are Ruining the Integrity of the Monero Network
Generated with BBoe's Subreddit Stats (Donate)
submitted by OsrsNeedsF2P to subreddit_stats [link] [comments]

How fair is the roulette on the Ethereum smart contract? An independent audit of the game contract

We present to your attention a roulette audit from an independent developer Paul Rubin. Read, study and share your opinion about roulette!
Today it is very unlikely to meet a person who hasn't heard about cryptocurrencies and, in particular, about Bitcoin. In 2014, on a wave of interest in bitcoin, a new cryptocurrency - Ethereum, has been created. Today, in 2018, it has the largest capitalization after bitcoin. One of its most important differences from bitcoin is the use of a Turing virtual machine - EVM. More information about the Ethererum can be found in its Yellow Paper.
Today we will explore a game that works with Metamask wallet, a plugin for Google Chrome.
The game is the realization of the European roulette: there is the field with 37 cells numbered from 0 to 36. A player can bet on a specific number, or on a set of numbers: even/odd, red/black, 1-12, 1-18, etc. In each round, the player can make multiple bets (the minimum bet size is 0.01 ETH ≈ $ 7.26) on the corresponding field of the game table. Each field corresponds to a winning ratio. For example, the rate "to red" corresponds to a coefficient of 2 - placing a bet in amount of 0.01 ETH, in case of winning, the player will receive 0.02 ETH. And if the player bets on zero, the coefficient will be 36: paying the same 0.01 ETH for the bet the player will get 0.36.
Note In the game contract, the coefficient for this bet is also listed as 35, and the bet amount is added to the amount of the win before the payment.
When all bets are made, the player presses the "Play" button and, via MetaMask, sends a bet to the Ethereum blockchain to the roulette contract address. The contract determines the random number, calculates the results of the bets and, if necessary, sends the winnings to the player.
In order to understand honestly whether the game is working (that is, if the casino does not manipulate when determining the random number for mercenary purposes), the work of the smart contract should be analyzed.
Its address is listed on the game website. In addition, before confirming the payment, you can check where the bet will be sent. The contract at the address 0xDfC328c19C8De45ac0117f836646378c10e0CdA3 will be analyzed as an example. Etherscan shows its code, and for convenient viewing, you can use Solidity Browser. The work of the contract begins with the placeBet() function.
For Solidity newbies: the public and payable modifiers mean that the function is part of the API contract and when you call it, you can send ETH. In this case, information about the sender and the ETH amount will be available via the variable msg. The call parameters are the bit mask of bet types and two 32-byte arrays with the number of bets per type. You can guess this by looking at the definition of the GameInfo type and the functions getBetValueByGamble(), getBetValue ().
It is worth noting that getBetValue() returns the amount of the bet in wei.
The first thing placeBet() checks is that the contract is not turned off and then bet checks begin. The gambles array is the repository of all the bets placed in this contract. placeBet() finds all the bets in its block and checks whether the current player has sent another bet in this block and whether the allowed amount of betting in the block is exceeded. Then, restrictions on the minimum and maximum amount of the bet are checked.
In the event of any error, the execution of the contract is terminated by the throw command, which rolls back the transaction, returning ETH to the player.
Further, the parameters passed to the function are stored in the GameInfo structure. It is important for us that the wheelResult field is initialized with the number 37.
After another check that the amount of bets coincides with the amount of ETH sent, the RLT tokens are distributed, the referral program is processed, the bet information is stored in gambles and a PlayerBet event is generated with the number and amount of the bet, which is seen in the game's web part.
RLT tokens At each bet, the player is given a certain number of RLT, ERC-20 tokens, which determine the right of the owner of tokens to receive the loyalty rewards from the profits received by the game creators. More information about this is given in White Paper.
The further life of the bet begins with calling the function ProcessGames(), which, after the appearance of a new bet, is being executed, at the present time, from the address 0xa92d36dc1ca4f505f1886503a0626c4aa8106497. Such calls are well visible when viewing the list of transactions of the game contract: they have Value=0.
ProcessGames code
In the call parameters, an array with the bet numbers requiring calculation is transmitted, and for each ProcessGame is called.
The call parameters are the bet number and the number of blocks that must pass between the bet and its processing. When called from ProcessGames() or ProcessGameExt(), this parameter is currently 1, this value can be learned from the result of calling getSettings().
In the event that the number of the block in which processing takes place is more than 255 blocks apart from the betting block, it can not be processed: the block hash is available only for the last 256 blocks, and it is needed to determine the number dropped.
Next, the code checks whether the result of the game has already been calculated (remember, wheelResult was initialized with the number 37, which can't be the game result?) and whether the required number of blocks has already passed.
If the conditions are met, the call to getRandomNumber() is done to determine the random number, the win is calculated by calling getGameResult(). If it is not zero, ETH is sent to the player: g.player.send(playerWinnings). Then an EndGame event is created, which can be read from the web part of the game.
Let's see the most interesting part: how to determine the random number: the function getRandomNumber().
Its arguments are the player's address and the block number in which the bet was placed. The first thing the function gets is a block hash, which is separated from the bet block for BlockDelay blocks into the future.
This is an important point because if a player can somehow learn the hash of this block in advance, he can form a bet that is guaranteed to win. If you remember that there are Uncle blocks in Ethereum, there may be a problem and further analysis is required.
Next, SHA-3 is calculated from the gluing of the player's address and the received block hash. The dropped number is calculated by taking the remainder of dividing the result of SHA-3 by 37.
From my point of view, the algorithm is quite honest and the casino has no precedence over the player.
Why does the casino bring profit to its owners?
There are 37 cells on the field. For example, a player wants to make 100 000 bets on one particular field. Probably, about 2703 times the player will win, and all the other times he will lose. In this case, from the casino winnings, the player will receive 2703 * 36 = 97,308 RLT tokens. And 2692 RLT tokens, spent on bets, will go to the casino. Similar calculations can be made for all other types of bets.
It is also interesting to see, how the win is calculated. The getGameResult() function does this.
Parameter here is the structure of GameInfo with data about the calculated bet. And its wheelResult field is already filled with a random number. Here is the cycle for all types of bets, in which the bit mask game.bets is checked and if the bit of the type being checked is installed, winMatrix.getCoeff() is requested. winMatrix is the contract with the address 0x073D6621E9150bFf9d1D450caAd3c790b6F071F2, loaded in the SmartRoulettee() constructor. A parameter of this function is a combination of the bet type and the random number.
Have you played the Blockchain roulette by SmartPlay.tech? Don’t forget to share your opinion with other players, join the Telegram chat with the early project investors and ask you questions to the official representatives.
submitted by SmartPlayTech to SmartPlayTech [link] [comments]

[far future concept] Nyanshares, Nythereumbits, and all-in on 37 rainbow

I'm hoping to work for the Nu project on documentation and development. We'll see how that works out. But just from doing some refreshing of my Nu knowledge, and from a thread I posted about a DiploCoin idea on /cryptocurrency, I've had the idea I'll describe herein.
This is not projected for anytime soon. NYAN2 and NYAN3 are important for security fixes and a demonstration of basic technical capacity. Mobile and lightweight wallets are going to be a nice addition. This is a next-generation project, probably not for implementation before 2018 at the earliest, after the aforementioned core NYAN projects are complete.
The concept for Nyanshares (NYS ? NYAN-SR?) is a culmination of my earlier ideas about trying to have dividends for NYAN hodling, as well the idea of having a friendly PoS sidekick coin for NYAN. It will be a fork of Nushares, with three ways of generating coins: the first will be a token 100 Nyanshares for myself I'll hardcode in to bootstrap the chain from. The second will be a 1% annual staking inflation. The third will be "HODL" messages which is the, so far as I know, new idea here: it's like a cross-chain stake. A NYAN signature of a Nyanshares address is the message (along with the NYAN address and Nyanshares address), and from that, the "days destroyed" if the coins at that address were spent is computed and Nyanshares are awarded in some proportion (perhaps 1 Nyanshare for each 365 NYAN coindays, so 1 NYAN held for a year would generate 1 Nyanshare with a HODL message). Of course if the same address is claimed again, then only the days since the last claim are valid.
So this gives us a PoS network of NYAN hodlers. My initial concept for this was basically a strawpolling system. Voting NYAN on the Nyanchain will be demonstrated with the NYAN3 hard fork, and theoretically on-chain polling should be possible continuously on any manner of thing. But perhaps the Nyanshares, reflecting the core hodler sentiment, might also be a useful signal, like a Senate versus a House (in theory more conservative representatives of larger stakeholders versus more democratic representation of all stakeholders). That may seem totally unnecessary, as it does to me, but it could be a cool tool and fun to play with.
One major distinction is that I would not envision this as the value-gaining portion of the system. Nyanshares would be designed for mostly novelty purposes. Its votes would not be binding on NYAN. Instead, it would be intended as a supporting entity to NYAN. So if Nyanshares were popular enough to have demand on a secondary market, the Nyanshareholders could authorize additional Nyanshare creation, and use the proceeds to buy NYAN on the open market and hodl or use for encouraging nyan somehow. Selling Nyanshares would not be a core goal however, in part because of not designing it to gain, or even hold, any particular value. But as a PoS chain with 1-min block times, it should be a reliable counterpart in its own right and perhaps useful for purposes I don't see right now.
Now Nu also has Nubits, which are pegged at the USD. This peg has held very well. When there is additional demand for nubits, they are created and sold and the proceeds go to the Nushareholders.
Originally I thought of Nyanbits as the tie here and didn't really see any point to them, but we could have a tiny market in them and hold a peg at a dollar just for the heck of it as an experiment to show we can, following the Nu model on a much smaller scale.
But then in thinking about the DiploCoin thread again and the Nu / Ethereum hybrid I'd proposed there ultimately, I realized that such a cross would be a nice innovation to plug into this idea. So imagine that we have a subsidiary coin controlled by Nyanshares where the peg is held to NBT (USD) like it is with Nu, but where that subsidiary chain actually operates as an Ethereum clone. Call this: Nythereumbits.
This would be an improvement over Ethereum in the same way that Nubits is an improvement over Bitcoins: by holding a constant peg, people could actually plan for the expenses of using the network reasonably (of course, this would imply needing to also increase capacity to meet demand or otherwise expenses could still rise, but at least they would not rise merely from increased demand for the computing token). Access to the system could remain cheap while profits accrue, in this particular setup, first to the Nyanshareholders as proceeds for creation of new Nythereumbits, and then the Nyanshareholders could invest/gamble those proceeds into open market purchases of NYAN...possibly on a nyan-themed fork of the B&C Exchange which uses NYAN as the core base-pair and where proceeds are similarly reinvested back into the core NYAN asset? ;-D
The Rainbow 37 concept is a separate one, but just decided to combo post this anyhow. I was smoking and had this idea, of course. I was thinking about analogies for my position in NYAN, as I often do, and I was thinking about Roulette and having a large bet on one of the numbers, like 37 or something. And I was thinking to myself, unable for the life of me to remember how the red/black coloring scheme went in roulette without looking it up, when I realized that the roulette wheel only goes up to 36...
So a bet of "37", regardless of color, on roulette, would be even more crazy than better "edge" on a "heads or tails" bet. At least the edge is conceptually possible. There is no 37 on a roulette wheel. There are zeros, and double zeroes in the US at least, but no 37s anywhere I believe.
0 is probably actually closer to our odds of reaching $1 than betting on 36 on a roulette wheel would be: The roulette wheel is 1:37 or 1:38, depending. Based on how far we have to go from our current market price to $1, it seems fair to say our odds right now are lower than 1% objectively speaking.
Of course, I believe we can affect the odds, and I hope and expect we'll somehow win ultimately, but I think the market risk premium is somewhat fair given how unlikely that looks from the outside.
Keep on keepin' on y'all. It will be truly legendary if we pull this off ultimately. :-)
submitted by coinaday to nyancoins [link] [comments]

Announing Block Chain Roulette - Multi-player, no signup, block based spin Bitcoin roulette game

To celebrate Bitcoin Friday, Block Chain Roulette is now online!
Check it out at BlockChainRoulette.com
Block Chain Roulette is a Bitcoin based game, like SatoshiDice. What is different about Block Chain Roulette is that you are playing at the same table as every other player. The wheel is spun every time a Bitcoin block is created.
Each possible roulette bet (including all of the various splits) has it's own unique Bitcoin address. To make a bet, just send your Bitcoin to the address that corresponds to the bet you wish to make. Multiple bets per transaction are allowed. Your not required to sign up for an account, just send some Bitcoin to an address. Bets made will automatically appear on the board. There is no need to refresh your browser, just sit back and watch the bets come in.
When a new block is created, all of the bet transaction that were included in that block are processed.
The minimum bet is 0.01 BTC and the maximum bets are: 0.25 BTC for inside bets and 0.50 for outside bets. Bets made under the limit will not be refunded. Limits will eventually be raised in the future after more testing is done.
The max bet limit is enforced per BTC sending address. Since each Bitcoin transaction may use several and different addresses for each transaction, there is effectively no max bet.
Because of this, the site needs to ensure it is able to pay all winning bets. If a bet is made that could not be paid should it win, the coins will be immediately refunded with the status "betting closed". This is similar to a real life roulette table when no more bets are accepted before the wheel stops spinning. The refund transaction sends back the exact same coins and the should confirm in the same block as the original transaction which shows the refund was issued before the block was created.
The game uses a European roulette board with a single zero Roulette board. The house edge on this game is 2.70%, which is a little bit higher than SatoshiDice at 1.9%, but it's a lot more fun than SatoshiDice! Just like real life roulette, it's fun to spread your chips on the table using some strategy or bet with other people on a number.
The method used to calculate each random number is explained in detail on the site. All random can be verified after they are selected.
Not all e-wallets will be compatible with this site, just like SatoshiDice. You need to be able to receive Bitcoin at the same address your bet was sent from. To test, send 0.001 BTC to any bet address.
Bots are welcome to play. There's a JSON API that should be easy to use to make a bitcoin roulette playing bot.
I'd love to hear your comments, feedback, suggestions, questions,etc. I'll post some stats on random number distribution so far through the first 207,000 blocks later today
submitted by BlockChainRoulette to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

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